Yat-Kha

From TyvaWiki
Jump to: navigation, search


Yat-Kha is a band from Tuva, led by vocalist/guitarist Albert Kuvezin. Yat-kha's music is a mixture of Tuvan traditional music and rock music, featuring Kuvezin's distinctive kargyraa throat singing style, the kanzat kargyraa.

Yat-Kha was founded in Moscow in 1991, as a collaborative project between Kuvezin and Russian avant-garde, electronic composer Ivan Sokolovsky. The project blended traditional Tuvan folk music with post-modern rhythms and electronic effects. Kuvezin and Sokolovsky toured and played festivals, and eventually took the name “Yat-Kha,” which refers to a type of small, Central Asian zither (similar to the Mongolian yatga and the Chinese guzheng), and which Kuvezin plays in addition to the guitar. Apparently, "yat-kha" is also a Tuvan slang word for Tuva during the Soviet period, meaning "poor wretch", "(dumb) little brother".

In 1993, Yat-Kha released a self-titled album on the General Records label. After the release of this album, Kuvezin and Sokolovsky parted creative ways. Kuvezin went on to release albums under the name Yat-Kha with other musicians (with less emphasis on electronics), beginning with Yenisei Punk in 1995 with morin khuur player Alexei Saaia. Sokolovsky issued a remastered version of the Yat-Kha album, with additional tracks, under the title Tundra's Ghosts in 1996/97.

Discography

Albums:

  • Priznak Greyushii Byedi (1991)
  • Khanparty (1992)
  • Yat-Kha (1993)
  • Yenisei Punk (1995)
  • Yenisei Punk (Remastered) (1999)
  • Tundra's Ghosts (1996/97) (remastered version of Yat-Kha released by Ivan Sokolovsky)
  • Dalai Beldiri (1999)
  • Aldyn Dashka (2000)
  • Bootleg. Yat-Kha in Europe Live 2001 (2002)
  • Tuva.Rock (2003)
  • Re-Covers (2005)
  • Bootleg 2005 (2005)

Members

Current:

Past:

Awards

  • 1991 recognized by Brian Eno, one of the international judges at the first Voices of Asia Festival in Almaty, Kazakhstan
  • 1995 French RFI "Decouvertes Est" prize for Yenisei Punk
  • 1999 German Critic's Prize for Dalai Beldiri
  • 2002 BBC Radio 3 "Award for World Music"

External links